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Different Types of Entertainment

November 22nd, 2013 · No Comments · adult entertainment horny moms, arts and entertainment, arts and entertainment channel, attempted entertainment, auto racing sports tickets entertainment, blizzard entertainment, entertainment book, entertainment centers, entertainment gossip, entertainment weekly, free adult entertainment, home entertainment centers, indianapolis entertainment, kansas city entertainment, myrtle beach entertainment, nashville entertainment, tv entertainment unit, violence in entertainment, vivid entertainment

Before we look into different types of entertainment, first let’s define what entertainment is. Entertainment is any kind of activity that provides amusement for people in a passive way, other entertaining activities that involve participating are considered recreation or hobbies.

There are many types of entertainment for particular tastes, for example we have cinema, theatre, sports, games, social dance, concert, comedy shows, animations, impressionists, clowns and the list goes on and on.

These form of entertainment can than be divided into groups according to the age and interest of the people being entertained. For instance we have child , adult , live action , public and corporate entertainment. In this article we’ll give a brief explanation to some of these forms.

Child Entertainment

Kids need to be entertained and some times the entertainer or the entertainment agency needs to find a balance between mental and physical activities. Clowns, puppets, pantomimes and cartoons tend to appeal to children, though adult might find it enjoyable too.

Adult Entertainment

Adult Entertainment many times is related to the sex industry, but this form of entertainment can not be related only with the sex industry and its branches. Adult Entertainment involves things like music concerts, live sports, opera and a hand full of other activities that kids might not find so appealing.

Live Entertainment

This form of entertainment is broadened to all ages as there are a variety of activities that can labelled as live entertainment. For instance music concerts, live TV shows, live sports, theatres and any other activity that you could think of that is aimed to amuse people.

Public Entertainment

Nowadays probably one of the forms of entertainment that have grown the most, thanks to the economic downturn. When you walk around any major city around Europe you will notice a wide range of public entertainers working for any amount of money the public decides to give them. There are public entertainers of all sorts from mimes to Peruvian Flute bands all working with the uncertainty of how much money they will make, that is why they tend to be more common in major cities where there are more tourists.

Corporate Entertainment

Aimed for corporate events, private parties, award ceremonies, product launches and it is better organized by a professional entertainment agency as most of time these events involve hundreds maybe thousands of people and no one better than the professionals to take care of these form of entertainment.

With these we cover the major forms of entertainment n the following article I’ll explain in depth each one of them with more details and examples.

SEO Consultant, blogger and social media expert working for THUK Media Online Marketing

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Creativity for Live Events Entertainment

August 18th, 2012 · No Comments · Adult Entertainment Club, adult entertainment horny moms, Amusement parks, art, arts and entertainment, arts and entertainment channel, Bars, BBQ, BBQ Restaurant, BBQ Ribs Restaurant, Beach Motel, Beachfront Weddings, Bed & Breakfast, Beer, billiards, Boat Charter Service, bowling, Box Lunch Supplier, Breakfast, Breakfast Restaurant, brew pub restaurant, Breweries, brewery, Brewpubs, Brunch, Brunch Restaurant, Butcher Shop, e entertainment, entertainment, reno entertainment, seattle entertainment

Creativity for events entertainment is becoming an essential necessity to the outcome of any event. Clients are looking for that talking point of the night and are requesting for something “different”. Event Managers are being stretched when it comes to creating imaginative entertainment ideas to find something brand new for their client.

Here are a list of some tips and ideas as to how you can bring something new to the table when it comes to live events entertainment and performances:

1. Know your clients and guests requirements. What are they looking to gain or achieve from the event? The better understanding you have of the brief the easier for the performer to recommend and provide the right performance for the event.

2. Use specialists within the entertainment industry like an entertainment company or a choreographer. If your event is heavily live event entertainment based you might want an entertainment specialist to help you pitch. They will know the act inside and out, so will be able to answer any questions from your client, which will help you win the pitch.

3. Build a relationship with the entertainment company. The events industry constantly use the word “supplier”, which I think is very cold. I see it as a partnership. The entertainment company should be the first people you go to for entertainment advice when you receive an enquiry. Ask them to brainstorm with you or to help you with entertainment solutions and ideas. It saves you time and will provide you with a great outcome. Keep them on speed dial!

4. If you can’t find the right events entertainment, produce it! There are so many creative’s within the events industry who will be able to produce a brand new act or performance. If your client wants something new or different, this is your answer. You will make your client very happy by saying you can 100% guarantee that none of your clients would have seen the entertainment you will be able to provide.

5. Always speak to your production team and make sure they are in contact with the live events entertainment you are providing. So many times you turn up on the day of the event and the lighting is of poor quality or the PA system is at the other end of the room so you can’t hear the music during the performance. Communication is key between the entertainment company and the production company. A 10-minute phone call can dissolve many potential problems you would find on the day. Lighting, sound and production must compliment the entertainment to ensure a high quality performance and to get your moneys worth.

6. Make sure you are thorough when reading the entertainment’s requirements. If you’re hiring a performer with detailed technical specifications such as aerial artists make sure the production team has it at the earliest convenience. You don’t want to book a fantastic aerial performer, but realise you can’t put rigging up due to health and safety.

7. Don’t let the act perform for longer than is needed. I think the most important rule when providing entertainment is leave the guests wanting more. Make an impact! This sounds like a simple rule, but this happens more often then not. This goes back to knowing what the intention and brief of the event.

8. Listen to the performer and entertainment company they will know what will work best for your event when it comes to performances and timings. They want to provide the very best entertainment and performance to ensure your event is perfect. Listen to their advice!

If you would like to enquire about booking live events entertainment or discussing any creative entertainment ideas, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

MishMash Management
Creative Dance and Entertainment Agency

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Tips On Booking The Best Entertainment Talent Agency

July 2nd, 2012 · No Comments · 2004 infiniti fx45 mobile entertainment system, adult entertainment, adult entertainment horny moms, arts and entertainment, arts and entertainment channel, atlanta entertainment, attempted entertainment, blizzard entertainment, chicago entertainment, corner entertainment center, dallas entertainment, entertainment agencies, entertainment gossip, entertainment tv, free adult entertainment, hastings entertainment, home entertainment, home entertainment centers, indianapolis entertainment, jacksonville entertainment, myrtle beach entertainment, philadelphia entertainment, summit entertainment, three oceans entertainment phoenix az, tv entertainment unit, violence in entertainment

When you host an event, particularly a business event, you want to make sure that you not only have the tasks associated with the business or core purpose of the event arranged to ensure success, but you also want to make sure that you have the best and most appropriate entertainment that your guests will enjoy. If you are having a difficult time trying to decide the best type of entertainment and where to secure the entertainment, you will greatly benefit from booking your entertainment using the services of an entertainment talent agency.

Booking the best entertainment agency means you will have the ability to select the entertainment for your event from a variety of different types of entertainment. When you book the best entertainment talent agency, you will be able to choose from such entertainers as: comedians, bands, musical tribute entertainers, celebrity impersonators, DJs, and more. The best entertainment agency will offer a variety of entertainers of different types and will assist you with choosing the best entertainment that blends well with your specific event.

Booking an entertainment agency is easy when you search the internet. When you look for an agency on the internet, you will be able to browse various entertainment agencies and review the services and types of entertainers they offer. You will get an idea of the costs and you will have their contact information so you can call or email them about the details of your event. They will then respond and provide you with more details about their agency and services and how they can help you.

The best entertainment agency will be easy to work with and understand your specific needs. They will listen to your wishes regarding your event and provide you with suggestions about the type of entertainment your specific guests will enjoy. The agency will also be more than willing to answer all of your questions and provide you with a price estimate. You can ask for references as well as find out how long they have been in the entertainment talent agency business. Also, when discussing your event, it is important to tell them your location so they can find the right entertainment for that particular event such as a big convention room, auditorium, or a smaller office type space. The best talent agency will provide the right entertainment to fit the theme of the event such as providing a comedian that delivers a clean non profanity comedic presentation. Understanding your guests is essential to getting the right entertainment for your event.

An entertainment talent agency can really help you get the right entertainment for your event. They can advise on the best entertainment that integrates well with the event, will help to rejuvenate attendees, and make the entire event much more enjoyable and memorable for the guests. When you hire an entertainment talent agency for your event, it will help ensure that the entertainment that you book makes the event a success. If you require entertainment services for your next event, consider booking an entertainment talent agency.

Trying to find corporate entertainment Toronto? Browse from an impressive roster of keynote speakers, motivational speakers, comedians and more at Corporateentertainers.ca !

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Common Questions For Entertainment Centers

April 27th, 2012 · No Comments · Accommodations, Adult Entertainment Club, adult video, alcohol, alleys, American Food Catering, American Restaurant, amusement, Amusement Center, Amusement parks, Arcades, art, Art galleries, Art Gallery, Attractions, Auditorium, Authentic French Cuisine, Authentic French Restaurant, Bagels, Bakeries, ballrooms, Banquet Hall, Barbecue Catering

If you own a home entertainment center or looking at new entertainment centers to buy, you probably have a few questions. There are a number of different types, sizes, and colors to choose from. If you’re purchasing your very first entertainment center, read through the following questions and answers, and get more familiar with the options you have.

What’s the Average Price Range of Entertainment Centers?
The price for a home entertainment center can range from under $100 to many thousands of dollars. The price will vary greatly based on the size, material, and design of the piece. Entertainment centers can be as simple as a TV stand with shelves to a complete unit that takes up an entire wall. The price will depend on what type of entertainment center you want.

What Materials are Entertainment Centers Made From?
Home entertainment centers are made of all sorts of materials. Often they use different materials to provide adequate function and sleek styling. Common materials include:

# Wood (oak, mahogany, Cedar, etc.)
# Metal
# Glass
# Plastic
# Pressboard

Often these materials are combined to create glass doors on a mahogany shelf unit or plastic wheels on a compact TV stand.

Will Furniture Stores that Sell Home Entertainment Centers Deliver to My Home?
Some do but some don’t. It all depends on the retailers. Entertainment centers can be quite large and require a truck for delivery. This means either you or the retailer needs to have a truck available to transport it from their store to your home. Be sure to ask about home delivery before you buy if you’re going to need some help getting it home.

Do They Sell Preassembled Entertainment Units?
It all depends on the size of the unit. The bigger it is, the more likely it is it won’t come preassembled. Parts of it might come together but the unit as a whole will need to be put together. Smaller units may come preassembled because they are smaller and more compact.

Does a TV Stand Count as a Home Entertainment Center?
The category of “entertainment center” is pretty broad and often includes TV stands and even small wall units. A TV stand that has shelves or drawers is definitely an entertainment center. Think about it; it’s a multifunctional furniture unit that allows for organization and storage of entertainment related items such as TV, movies, DVDs, VCRs, DVD players, etc. So if you’re looking for smaller storage units or shelving, be sure to check the “home entertainment centers” section of your local furniture store or online retailer.

Can I Find Matching Furniture to Go with My Entertainment Center?
In some cases you can. Often times furniture designers will design a complete living room/family room/den furniture set. This can include matching entertainment centers, recliners, couches, and even coffee tables. If you want all your furniture to match, it’s best to find a furniture collect designed to work together.

Do They Sell Home Entertainment Centers Online?
In fact, they do. Many online furniture retailers sell home entertainment centers. In some cases you might be able to find a better price online. However, the one issue with buying an entertainment center online is shipping. If you want a large unit, expect to pay a significant amount to get it shipped to your home.

Can I Make My Own Entertainment Unit?
It is possible to make your own home entertainment unit but it’s only suggested for professional or experienced wood workers or cabinet makers. Depending on the size you want, building your own entertainment center can be quite difficult. You need to plan everything out first, establish measurements, buy the materials, and then put it together. Although it may save you some money in the long run, it could take you months to build it.

Chuck is an interior decorator who has worlds of experience in interior design. Believe it or not, his expertise is in entertainment centers. If you’re interested in learning all about the entertainment center world, turn to EntertainmentCenters123.com.

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How to Hire Corporate Entertainment

February 9th, 2011 · No Comments · 2004 infiniti fx45 mobile entertainment system, arts and entertainment, auto racing sports tickets entertainment, blizzard entertainment, dallas entertainment, definition of a home entertainment system, denver entertainment, entertainment in detroit, entertainment in las vegas, hastings entertainment, indianapolis entertainment, kansas city entertainment, lake tahoe entertainment, las vegas entertainment, nashville entertainment, philippine entertainment portal, regal entertainment, seattle entertainment, violence in entertainment, vivid entertainment, world wrestling entertainment

For many people, hiring entertainment for a corporate event can be an overwhelming task. The entertainment you select has to be professional and suited for all audiences. On the other hand, it is easy to get stuck in the corporate rut of doing “the same old thing” year after year.

How important is keeping your existing clients and employees for your organization? Showing appreciation to clients and your staff can boost morale, strengthen business relationships and help your company grow. Having the right entertainment at your event will accomplish that!

So how do you break from the ordinary and book entertainment that is new and engaging for your group? Below are some suggestions to make the hiring process easier for you.

1. Plan Your Event

Plan how would like the evening to go. If you know the exact type of entertainment you are having, then plan the event around that entertainment. Otherwise, plan out time for the different events and make a time-table. If you haven’t decided on the entertainment then be sure to leave some room in your time-table for adjustments. The setup of the room can vary depending on the performer you desire, and the itinerary can change as well.

2. Know Your Budget

Know how much you can spend on entertainment before approaching entertainers to find out about their acts. What you can spend on an entertainer will often dictate the level of entertainment you get. Every event has a budget and you need to stay within it and meet your needs. However, hiring an entertainer based solely on them being the lowest priced can lead to disaster. Put things in a better perspective, you may wish to determine your “per-person” cost budgeted for entertainment or activities. The finest food and beverages will soon be a fading memory to your guests, but high quality entertainment creates an emotional impact and lasting impression. How much fun they had at your event is what creates lasting memories.

3. Be Prepared to Discuss Your Event and Your Budget

Any professional entertainer is going to be asking you questions about your event, such as what type of event you are having, how many guests you expect, if there is a theme to the event, a general timeline of the event, etc. By doing this, they are determining if their act is a good match for your group and function. They may even be able to present ideas to enhance your event that you hadn’t thought of yet! Ask the entertainer if they offer any special packages. Your entertainer may have a package that will make your event extra special. By discussing your budget with them, you are also finding out if they are within your price range. If so you can move on with the process; if not, you are saving everyone time and should call the next entertainer on your list.

4. Request References and Promotional Material

If after your initial contact with the entertainer you feel comfortable with them and you both agree that there is a possibility that they will be a good match for your group, ask them for references and promotional materials. You will find that most entertainers have websites that will contain most of the promotional materials, if not all of it. If an entertainer cannot provide you with references then DO NOT engage this performer.

5. Call References and Review the Promotional Material

After calling references and reviewing the promotional material, you may have more questions for the entertainer. Give them a call and get your concerns addressed and all questions answered.

Make sure that your entertainer is a corporate entertainment specialist that knows the needs and expectations of the corporate environment. A comedian that regularly performs “R” rated shows in comedy clubs or a magician that typically works at child birthday parties would probably not make a suitable choices for a typical corporate conference!

6. Ask About a Guarantee

Want some real peace of mind when trying to plan your corporate event? If an entertainer presents a quality presentation and has enough experience, they should be willing to guarantee their services. As them what they guarantee!

7. Request a Contract

The entertainer should provide you with a contract outlining your agreement along with the date, location of your event as well as any other arrangements agreed upon. Unless you are booking a celebrity performer, the agreement will probably be no more than a couple of pages in length.

The contract should clearly state what you will be required to provide for the event, such as a sound system or lighting requirements, and what the entertainer will be providing. In some cases some of this information will come in the form of a Technical Rider which is sent with the contract. The agreement should also cover deposits (typically 50% of the total fee) travel fees, per diem charges, meals and transportation. All of this should have been discussed in the initial phone call, and there should not be any surprises for you on the agreement. Most entertainers will require the contract signed and returned with the deposit within a certain timeframe of sending it.

8. Communicate

Your entertainer is there to enhance your event. Keeping him or her informed of any changes in your event helps them to bring you the show you would like, especially if they are doing any customized material for you. If they are doing a customized performance for you event it is essential to get the needed information to them as early as possible.

A professional entertainer will also want to make sure they are there early to setup and do sound checks before the scheduled show time.

9. Promote the Event

Get people excited about the event by promoting the great entertainment you have booked for them! Your entertainer should be able to make this easy for you by providing you with articles, press releases, or photos that you can use in your event literature to build anticipation. Some entertainers are willing to provide “teaser” performances in order to get people excited to come to your event!

10. Sit Back, Relax, and Enjoy the Show!

By using these simple steps, you should feel confident that the entertainer you have chosen is a professional. You’ve worked hard up until this point, so sit back and enjoy what you’ve put together!

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Performance Clauses In Entertainment Contracts

September 5th, 2010 · No Comments · arts and entertainment, arts entertainment, blizzard entertainment, corner entertainment center, denver entertainment, e entertainment, entertainment, entertainment book, entertainment centers, entertainment tonight, jacksonville entertainment, kansas city entertainment, las vegas entertainment, nashville entertainment, regal entertainment, regal entertainment group, reno entertainment, summit entertainment

Producing and editing a masterwork of recorded music is obviously a specialized art form. But so is the entertainment lawyer’s act of drafting clauses, contracts, and contractual language generally. How might the art of the entertainment attorney’s legal drafting a clause or contract affect the musician, composer, songwriter, producer or other artist as a practical matter? Many artists think they will be “home free”, just as soon as they are furnished a draft proposed record contract to sign from the label’s entertainment attorney, and then toss the proposed contract over to their own entertainment lawyer for what they hope will be a rubber-stamp review on all clauses. They are wrong. And those of you who have ever received a label’s “first form” proposed contract are chuckling, right about now.

Just because a U.S. record label forwards an artist its “standard form” proposed contract, does not mean that one should sign the draft contract blindly, or ask one’s entertainment lawyer to rubber-stamp the proposed agreement before signing it blindly. A number of label forms still used today are quite hackneyed, and have been adopted as full text or individual clauses in whole or in part from contract form-books or the contract “boilerplate” of other or prior labels. From the entertainment attorney’s perspective, a number of label recording clauses and contracts actually read as if they were written in haste – just like Nigel Tufnel scrawled an 18-inch Stonehenge monument on a napkin in Rob Reiner’s “This Is Spinal Tap”. And if you are a musician, motion picture fan, or other entertainment lawyer, I bet you know what happened to Tap as a result of that scrawl.

It stands to reason that an artist and his or her entertainment lawyer should carefully review all draft clauses, contracts, and other forms forwarded to the artist for signature, prior to ever signing on to them. Through negotiation, through the entertainment attorney, the artist may be able to interpose more precise and even-handed language in the contract ultimately signed, where appropriate. Inequities and unfair clauses aren’t the only things that need to be removed by one’s entertainment lawyer from a first draft proposed contract. Ambiguities must also be removed, before the contract can be signed as one.

For the artist or the artist’s entertainment attorney to leave an ambiguity or inequitable clause in a signed contract, would be merely to leave a potential bad problem for a later day – particularly in the context of a signed recording contract which could tie up an artist’s exclusive services for many years. And remember, as an entertainment lawyer with any longitudinal data on this item will tell you, the artistic “life-span” of most artists is quite short – meaning that an artist could tie up his or her whole career with one bad contract, one bad signing, or even just one bad clause. Usually these bad contract signings occur before the artist seeks the advice and counsel of an entertainment attorney.

One seemingly-inexhaustible type of ambiguity that arises in clauses in entertainment contracts, is in the specific context of what I and other entertainment lawyers refer to as a contract “performance clause”. A non-specific commitment in a contract to perform, usually turns out to be unenforceable. Consider the following:

Contract Clause #1: “Label shall use best efforts to market and publicize the Album in the Territory”.

Contract Clause #2: “The Album, as

delivered to Label by Artist, shall be produced and edited using only first-class facilities and equipment for sound recording and all other activities relating to the Album”.

One shouldn’t use either clause in a contract. One shouldn’t agree to either clause as written. One should negotiate contractual edits to these clauses through one’s entertainment lawyer, prior to signature. Both clauses set forth proposed contractual performance obligations which are, at best, ambiguous. Why? Well, with regard to Contract Clause #1, reasonable minds, including those of the entertainment attorneys on each side of the transaction, can differ as to what “best efforts” really means, what the clause really means if different, or what the two parties to the contract intended “best efforts” to mean at the time (if anything). Reasonable minds, including those of the entertainment lawyers on each side of the negotiation, can also differ as to what constitutes a “first-class” facility as it is “described” in Contract Clause #2. If these contractual clauses were ever scrutinized by judge or jury under the hot lights of a U.S. litigation, the clauses might well be stricken as void for vagueness and unenforceable, and judicially read right out of the corresponding contract itself. In the view of this particular New York entertainment attorney, yes, the clauses really are that bad.

Consider Contract Clause #1, the “best efforts” clause, from the entertainment lawyer’s perspective. How would the artist really go about enforcing that contractual clause as against a U.S. label, as a practical matter? The answer is, the artist probably wouldn’t, at end of day. If there ever were a contract dispute between the artist and label over money or the marketing expenditure, for example, this “best efforts” clause would turn into the artist’s veritable Achilles Heel in the contract, and the artist’s entertainment attorney might not be able to help the artist out of it as a practical matter:

Artist: “You breached the ‘best efforts’ clause in the contract!”

Label: “No! I tried! I tried! I really did!”

You get the idea.

Why should an artist leave a label with that kind of contractual “escape-hatch” in a clause? The entertainment lawyer’s answer is, “no reason at all”. There is absolutely no reason for the artist to put his or her career at risk by agreeing to a vague or lukewarm contractual marketing commitment clause, if the marketing of the Album is
perceived to be an essential part of the deal by and for the artist. It often is. It would be the artist’s career at stake. If the marketing spend throughout the contract’s Term diminishes over time, so too could the artist’s public recognition and career as a result. And the equities should be on the artist’s side, in a contractual negotiation conducted between entertainment attorneys over this item.

Assuming that the label is willing to commit to a contractual marketing spend clause at all, then, the artist-side entertainment lawyer argues, the artist should be entitled to know in advance how his or her career would be protected by the label’s expenditure of marketing dollars. Indeed, asks the entertainment attorney, “Why else is the artist signing this deal other than an advance, marketing spend, and tour support?”. The questions may be phrased a bit differently nowadays, in the current age of the contract now known as the “360 deal”. The clauses may evolve, or devolve, but the equitable arguments remain principally the same.

The point is, it is not just performers that should be held to performance clauses in contracts. Companies can be asked by entertainment lawyers to subscribe to performance clauses in contracts, too. In the context of a performance clause – such as a record label’s contractual obligation to market and publicize an album – it is incumbent upon the artist, and the artist’s entertainment attorney if any, to be very specific in the clause itself about what is contractually required of the record company. It should never be left to a subsequent verbal side conversation. In other words, working with his or her entertainment lawyer, the artist should write out a “laundry-list” clause setting forth each of the discrete things that the artist wants the label to do. As but a partial example:

Contract Clause #3: “To market and publicize the Album in the Territory, you, Label, will spend no less than ‘x’ U.S. dollars on advertising for the Album during the following time period: ____________”; or even,

Contract Clause #4: “To market and publicize the Album in the Territory, you, Label, will hire the ___________ P.R. firm in New York, New York, and you will cause no less than ‘y’ U.S. dollars to be expended for publicity for and directly relating to the Album (and no other property or material) during the following time period: _____________”.

Compare Clauses #3 and #4, to Contract Clause #1 earlier above, and then ask yourself or your own entertainment attorney: Which are more hortatory? Which are more precise?

As for Contract Clause #2 and its vague unexplained definition of “first-class facilities and equipment” – why not have one’s entertainment lawyer instead just include in the contract a laundry-list clause of the names of five professional recording studios in the relevant city, that both parties, label and artist, prospectively agree constitute “first-class” for definitional purposes? This is supposed to be a contract, after all, the entertainment attorney opines. “Don’t leave your definitions, and therefore definitional problems, for a later document or a later day, unless you truly want to make a personal financial commitment to keeping more litigators awash in business debating bad clauses and bad contracts before the courts”.

If you don’t ask, you don’t get. Through the entertainment lawyer, the artist should make the label expressly sign on to a very specific contractual list of tasks in an appropriate clause, monitor the label’s progress thereafter, and hold the label to the specific contractual standard that the artist was smart enough to “carve in” in the clause through the entertainment attorney in the first instance.

Again, consider Contract Clause #2, the “first class facilities and equipment” clause, from the entertainment lawyer’s perspective. Note that, unlike Contract Clause #1, this is a promise made by the artist to the label – and not a promise made by the label to the artist.

So, an artist might now ask his or her entertainment attorney:

“The shoe’s on the other foot, isn’t it?”

“‘First class’ in that clause is as vague and undefined a contractual standard as ‘best efforts’, isn’t it, entertainment lawyer?”

Entertainment attorney answer: “Right”.

“So, entertainment lawyer, there won’t be any harm in me, the artist, signing onto that contractual clause, will there, because I will be able to wiggle out of it if I ever had to, right?”

Entertainment attorney answer: “Wrong”.

The fact is, a contractual ambiguity in a performance clause is a bad thing – in either case – whether in the context of a label obligation to artist; or even in the context of an artist obligation to a label. The entertainment lawyer should advise that any contractual ambiguity in any clause could hurt the artist, even in the context of one of the artist’s own obligations to the other contracting party. Don’t rest on the linchpin of ambiguities in clauses when conducting business and relying on contracts – even if, in your musical art form itself, as Cameron Crowe once suggested of my first guitar hero Peter Frampton, you may happen to write “obscurantist” song lyrics while taking your own artistic license. Contracts need to be handled differently.

Here’s how ambiguity in your own contractual commitment to a label hurts you, from the entertainment lawyer’s perspective. The old-saw contractual principle of music “delivery” often finds the artist required to hand over documents to the label, as well as physical materials such as the album itself in the form of masters, digital masters, or “glass masters”, in order to get paid. By virtue of a contractually-delineated procedure vetted by and between entertainment attorneys, the label may be entitled to hold some (or even all) monies back, and not pay those monies to the artist until “delivery is complete” under the delivery clauses and delivery schedule in a contract. As one might therefore guess, “delivery” is a definite event whose occurrence or non-occurrence under the contract is oft-contested and sometimes even arbitrated or otherwise litigated by and between artists, labels, and the entertainment lawyers and litigators that represent them.

It is incumbent upon the artist and the artist’s entertainment attorney to prevent the label from drumming-up a pretextual “failed delivery” under any clause in the contract as an excuse for non-payment. In the context of Contract Clause #2 above, “first-class facilities and equipment” could easily become that pretext – the artist’s Achilles Heel in the litigation-tested contract contested between entertainment lawyer litigators. The label could simply take the position through counsel or otherwise that the delivered materials were not created at a “first-class” facility as contractually required in the relevant clause, no matter what facility was used. Why? Because “first-class” was never defined in any clause in the contractual document by either entertainment attorney on either side, as any particular facility.

And if no clause in the contract explicitly defined “first class” as an entertainment lawyer would have advised that it should do, then the artist could well be out the money, at least for the entire duration of an eminently avoidable multi-year litigation over what 2 dumb words mean. Worse yet, meanwhile, the label might be holding the money and laughing at the artist behind the artist’s back for his or her lack of contractual prescience. From the artist-side entertainment lawyer’s perspective, both of those horror-show possible eventualities and scenarios, are intolerable. They could have been avoided by a single, better clause – often the narrow reed upon which an artist’s success ultimately rests. (Ask Billy Joel. Ask Neil Young. Ask Bruce Springsteen. Ask George Michael. Ask John Fogerty).

What about prescience? How can this foreseeable contractual delivery dispute in the context of Contract Clause #2, be avoided by the entertainment lawyer? The simple solution in this case, again, is for the artist’s entertainment attorney to take a few extra minutes during the negotiations, and textually list-out, in a reply draft counter-proposed contract sent to the label, even if a single succinct clause, the actual facilities intended to be used. The artist-side entertainment lawyer can seek to make the label explicitly contractually pre-agree to the list of facilities, by name and address, in the body of the contract’s text. That is what a contract is for, anyway, as an entertainment attorney will tell you. When used correctly, a contract and its clauses really just comprise a dispute-avoidance tool. An entertainment contract should be a dispute-avoidance tool exchanged between entertainment lawyers. Also note that a contractual ambiguity in a clause could hurt an artist, regardless of whether it is embedded in one of the artist’s performance obligations, or even in one of the label’s performance obligations! The moral?: List all performance obligations. Break them down into discrete and understandable tasks, clause by clause. Approach it the same way an entertainment attorney would. Better yet – enlist the assistance of one before forming an opinion about the clauses or signing the contract.

Click the “Articles” button at: http://www.tormey.org/art.htm to return to the main Articles page.

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This article is not intended to, and does not constitute, legal advice with respect to your particular situation and fact pattern. Do secure counsel promptly, if you see any legal issue looming on the horizon which may affect your career or your rights. What applies in one context, may not apply to the next one. Make sure that you seek individualized legal advice as to any important matter pertaining to your career or your rights generally.

“Performance” Clauses In Entertainment Contracts
(c) John J. Tormey III, PLLC.
All Rights Reserved.

My entertainment law practice includes the drafting, editing, negotiation, and closure of personal service agreements as well as all other entertainment transactional and advisory matters in the fields of music, film, television, publishing, Internet, and all other media and art forms. If you have questions about legal issues which affect your career, and require representation, please contact me:

Law Office of John J. Tormey III, Esq.
John J. Tormey III, PLLC
217 East 86th Street, PMB 221
New York, NY 10028
(212) 410-4142 (phone)
(212) 410-2380 (fax) e-mail: [email protected]

http://www.tormey.net

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Choosing Wedding Entertainment For Your Reception

April 12th, 2010 · No Comments · adult entertainment, entertainment, entertainment book, entertainment centers, entertainment news, entertainment tonight, entertainment weekly, las vegas entertainment, world wrestling entertainment

So you’ve just got engaged! It’s now time for the excitement to begin. You’ve got a wedding to plan! At this point you’ve probably got a lot of questions running through your mind. Where do you begin? What questions should I ask vendors? Where am I going to get the money? Wait, how much money are we talking about? On the contrary to what most couples believe, wedding planning can actually be fun. With proper planning and allocated time to complete it you can create your truly unique and exciting Chicago Wedding reception.

When it comes to the entertainment portion of your reception this should be treated with care as with all your other very important wedding details. The entertainment seems to be one of, if not the most important components to a reception. Sure, the food, decorations, and socialization are very important but without entertainment, these events would take on an entirely different personality.

For affairs that are focuses around the entertainment, or at least ones where it is responsible for a major role in the success or failure of the event, some serious considerations must be taken when hiring the right entertainment.

Will you find the right entertainment by hiring the one that answers the phone first or the one that has the lowest price or would you select one just because they live in your hometown? These are actually several things you should consider before selecting your entertainer:

  1. Is the entertainer experienced in providing services for your event type? This question can’t just be answered in a yes or no question either. You’ll want someone who knows the ropes. How much experience do you want your entertainer to have? Consider getting a list of references from previous clients.
  2. Who will actually be the entertainer at your event? Often times with larger multi-operational companies you won’t actually know who your entertainer is until that night. Is this something you’re willing to accept? Always ask this question when shopping for entertainment and make sure it’s laid out clear and concise in your contract.
  3. What type of equipment do you deserve to have at your event? Imagine not being able to understand announcements or even worse hearing a hiss or buzz during your event. Imagine having part of your beautifully decorated event contain an eyesore of wires and beat up equipment. Another important face is just because an entertainer charges top dollar doesn’t always mean they’ll bring top dollar equipment to your event. Getting a picture of their setup is a must!
  4. What additional services are included other than just playing music? Will you need a master of ceremonies (emcee) at your event, a coordinator, or even someone to interact and participate with your crowd? Is your entertainer willing to step up to the plate and deliver those services? These can be important things to ask before your event. You’d hate to hire an entertainer who can’t entertain.
  5. Is your entertainer and elegant public speaker? Do they speak in complete sentences without stuttering and using um and uh? Public speaking is said to be one of the number one fears in the United States. If someone isn’t good at speaking in person odds are they won’t be able to speak in front of your crowd. This is a very important aspect of the entertainer can be over looked.
  6. Is backup equipment provided and immediately available? As you know all electronics are man-made and with all man-made products they can fail. So it’s important that your entertainer have not only backup equipment but also a backup plan. Ask your entertainer for their backup plan.
  7. What happens if the entertainer is ill or otherwise cannot attend your event? These details should be laid out in a written contract form with EVERY service provider. Always lay these things out prior to your event to prevent any situations later on.
  8. Is your entertainer insured? Every legitimate business has insurance. This may not seem important upfront, but heaven forbid something were to happen at your event. Are you willing to hire an entertainer without it? Ask your entertainer for his proof of property AND liability insurance.
  9. Are there any hidden additional charges or expected necessities from your entertainer? For example, are you required to pay a service charge for stairs at the reception hall? Or are you required to pay for their dinner? Will they need to take smoke breaks? If you’re entertainer doesn’t cover these issues in their sales pitch perhaps you should ask them.
  10. How much input will you be able to give on your music selection? This can also be a very important question when you’re shopping for entertainment. Everyone has their own tastes and preferences when it comes to music. Will your entertainer be able to cater to those tastes or will they stick to their own routine. Also does your entertainer offer online music planning?

With so much riding on the success of your event your entertainment should never be over looked. There should be several factors that come into play rather than just price when shopping for your wedding entertainment. Don’t ever be afraid to ask questions as the entertainment will have a direct impact on the entire success of your reception.

Article written by Stevie Dee of Operation Getdown DJs.

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Hello world!

February 23rd, 2010 · 1 Comment · Journal

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